Category Archives: RBKC Resources & News HS

What Works in Schools and Colleges to Increase Physical Activity

This updated report summarises evidence of what works in schools and colleges to promote levels of activity amongst children and young people.

The evidence suggests an association between being physically active, and academic attainment and attention. Being physically active also helps to promote physical and emotional health and wellbeing.

Children and young people who are physically active are more likely to continue the habit into adult life.

This document is intended for:

  • headteachers
  • college principals
  • staff working in education settings
  • directors of public health
  • wider educational partners

Are your Food Resources Fit for Purpose?

Food – a fact of life has published Guidelines for producers and users of school education resources about food. These voluntary guidelines can be used to support the development of high quality resources or to audit resources already in use in school.

For more information and to view the guidelines, click here.

Review on Childhood Obesity Prevention – Updated

Interventions for preventing obesity in children – an updated Cochrane review

More children are becoming overweight and obese worldwide. Being overweight as a child can cause health problems, and children may be affected psychologically and in their social life. Overweight children are likely also to be overweight as adults and continue to experience poor physical and mental health.

The review authors searched many scientific databases to find studies that looked at ways of preventing obesity in children. They included studies aimed at all ages of children. Studies were included only if the methods they were using were aimed at changing children’s diet, or their level of physical activity, or both. Only the studies that contained the best information to answer this question, ‘randomised controlled trials’ or RCTs, were searched for.

To read the results of this review click here

Measles: Don’t Let Your Child Catch It!

This flyer for schools provides information and advice on measles and the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine. It is now available with additional translated versions of the leaflet.

This information is designed for use in schools, healthcare centres, A&E departments, hospital wards, walk-in centres and GP practices. It addresses common questions about measles and the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine that protects against the disease.

Click here for the Flyer – Measles: Don’t Let Your Child Catch It!

NHS ‘Top Tips’ for Families to Stay Safe During a Heatwave

England’s most senior nurse has set out ways to stay safe during hot weather.

While the effects of too much sun can affect anyone, some are more at risk to the danger of hot weather including:

  • Young children, babies, and the elderly, especially those over 75;
  • People with serious chronic conditions and mobility problems such as Parkinson’s disease or those who have had a stroke, and;
  • People on certain medications, including those that affect sweating and temperature control.

Ten tips for coping in hot weather

  1. Shut windows and pull down the shades when it is hotter outside. You can open the windows for ventilation when it is cooler.
  2. If you’re vulnerable to the effects of heat, avoid the sun during the hottest part of the day (11am to 3pm).
  3. Keep rooms cool by using shades or reflective material outside the windows. If this isn’t possible, use light-coloured curtains and keep them closed (metallic blinds and dark curtains can make the room hotter).
  4. Have cool baths or showers, and splash yourself with cool water.
  5. Drink plenty of fluids and avoid excess alcohol – water, lower-fat milks and tea and coffee are good options.
  6. Listen to alerts on the radio, TV and social media about keeping cool.
  7. Plan ahead to make sure you have enough supplies, such as food, water and any medications you need.
  8. Identify the coolest room in the house so you know where to go to keep cool.
  9. Wear loose, cool clothing, and a hat and sunglasses if you go outdoors.
  10. Check up on friends, relatives and neighbours who may be less able to look after themselves.

For more information click here