Case Study: Using Evidence-Based Interventions to Reduce levels of Inactivity in London Schools

At a time when young people’s physical activity levels are at a depressingly low level and childhood obesity continues to rise, there has never been a better time to hear of a desire to get young people more active. There is, of course, considerable evidence that young children who adopt an active lifestyle early in life have better health, education and social outcomes, so supporting all young Londoners to develop physical activity habits offers a clear pathway to greater health equality.

In order to create the systemic change required to change the attitudes and behaviours of young people, London Sport worked with 19 schools from across 10 different London boroughs to see if adding one evidence based intervention would have a positive impact on reducing inactivity and increasing activity.

The programme

London Sport invited primary schools to benefit from one of four initiatives that could provide evidence of the impact they could have on reducing levels of inactivity. Twenty schools were selected from the list of schools that London Sport had previously supported in their Primary School Support role and were all based in boroughs with high levels of inactivity, deprivation and childhood obesity.

London Sport selected four interventions that research had shown could evidence the positive impact that they could have on reducing inactivity.

The impact
  • 67% of schools surveyed had seen an increase of pupil’s participation in PE, sport and physical activity.
  • 96% of children said they were more determined to improve their fitness.
  • Teachers noted an increase in confidence with children being so enthusiastic that they are actively asking to go running and reminding their teachers if they forget to take them out.
  • Some teachers are more active with their children: more active teachers create more active children.
  • Behaviour in class has improved and pupils are ready to learn for longer.

To read more about this study, click on the link: London Sport Case Study